Sunday Rituals

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Clean out your fridge weekly.  An organized space lends itself to an organized mind.  Plus no one likes old food in their fridge.

We all have them.

Once upon a time, in a kingdom far away, my Sunday ritual consisted of recovering from Saturday night.  Maybe sauntering to a midday brunch with friends where I would continue my “recovery” with bottomless sugary mimosas that left me feeling sluggish and out of commission for the rest of the day.  Daytime drinking coupled with poor food choices throughout the weekend would leave me feeling bloated and guilty on Monday morning.

Daytime drinking is also not very conducive to the productive sorts of activities that promote readiness and success for the upcoming week.  I arrived at work on Monday not only feeling a complete lack of physical rejuvenation, but a lack of mental revitalization as well.  Somewhere along the way, as I matured and started integrating more mindful and healthful habits into my life, I found my Sunday priorities drastically shifting.

There is something so satisfying and refreshing about waking up on Monday morning knowing that things in your life have been literally and figuratively put back into their proper places.  I no longer drift through my Sundays dreading the week to come, rather I intentionally prepare myself to be as successful as I can for the week.  I am a firm believer that how you spend your Sunday will completely set the tone for the following week.  If you fail to prepare, you will be frantic and stressed on Monday morning, and that attitude will carry itself throughout the remainder of the week.

It is important to engage in activities that make your home feel organized, as well as your mind.  This way you can arrive into the week with a tranquilly clean slate.  Exactly how you choose to prepare for your week is up to you, but here are the activities that I engage in every Sunday (yes every) in order to ensure that my life is in order.  Some of these things may seem boring or mundane, but I find that I actually quite enjoy my Sundays and even look forward to this process.

5 Sunday Success Habits

  1. Cleaning – I am actually the most OCD person, so I tend to clean a little bit each day rather than saving it all up for the weekend.  I wake up with so much energy on Sunday mornings that I usually spend about 30-45 minutes doing this first thing  just to get it out of the way.  Whether I need to sweep the floor or straighten our bedroom, I just. DO. IT.  Keeping your space clean and organized will help your mind stay organized.
  2. Laundry – Is there anything better than starting the week with fresh smelling clothes? This is especially true when you basically live at the gym. I never start Monday morning with dirty clothes in the hamper.  Also, never leave dirty clothes on the floor or on “that chair” (you know the one).  It literally takes .037 seconds to throw those socks into the hamper *ahem men in the house ahem*.  If you like multi-tasking like me, throw one load of laundry in and then start your cleaning while the clothes wash.
  3. Church – Maybe you are not very religious.  I haven’t always been, if I’m being perfectly honest, but we go to an amazing church (check it out: Vous Church) here in Miami.  Every Sunday we leave the sermon SO PUMPED to be our best selves.  It’s a chance for self-reflection and a chance to refocus on what is important in your life.
  4. Groceries/Mealprep – My boyfriend and I have been mealprepping our lunches for almost two years now.  Every Sunday we go together to get all our groceries for the week (usually Trader Joe’s because it’s awesome) and split the cost down the middle.  We generally get exactly what we need, no excess.  And if we decide on Wednesday we want to eat something that’s not in the house? Too bad, put it in on the list for next week.  This is an amazing way to save money and to avoid food waste. The mealprepping process is messy and experimental when you’re first starting out.  But with practice you will get it down to a science and figure out exactly what you need.  We probably spend about an hour grocery shopping, and 2-2 1/2 hours cooking each Sunday.  I usually take this time as well to reorganize and clean out the fridge.
  5. Gratitude Journaling – Some people make this a daily habit.  I choose instead to take 15-20 minutes each Sunday to reflect on the week that has just passed, as well as the week ahead.  I set my intentions for the week and this helps me to start Monday morning with the most positive mindset possible.  Cleaning your house is important, but I would argue that cleaning your mind out each week is even more important.

That’s it.

These are the things that I cannot go to bed on Sunday without having completed.  If I do, I feel very thrown off and unprepared.  Even with these 5 essential activities, there is plenty of time left in the space around them to relax and recharge.  Use this time to catch up on reading, catch up on work/emails (if that’s something necessary for your Monday success), or even catch up on sleep.  Technically I don’t think its scientifically possible to “catch up” on sleep, but naps are always nice 🙂

If you are a keen observer, you will notice that I did NOT include working out on this list.  The truth is, I go to the gym just about every Monday-Friday, and most Saturdays.  So even though I am just a little obsessed with crossfit and working out, I am completely okay with taking Sundays to recover.  Sometimes we go for a nice, sunny walk with our pup, other times we just spend time with family, friends, or each other.

Last, but not least, GO TO BED EARLY.  I cannot reiterate enough: get a full, restful night of sleep on Sunday night.  If you start Monday morning grumpy, sleepy, and exhausted, not only will your Monday obligations be challenging and unpleasant, but I promise that this will carry throughout your week.  As I mentioned, you can’t just catch up on sleep, so it’s important to get at least 7-9 hours each night.

Happy Sunday, friends! I hope you all have a productive Sunday full of gratitude and good energy!

YOU GOAL GIRL!


So much to look forward to in the coming year.

Since it’s the last day of 2018, I’d like to take a quick intermission from my pregnancy series to talk about goal-setting and some goals I have for the upcoming year. I don’t really like to use the term “resolution” – that word conjures up images of grand schemes that fizzle out after the first couple weeks of January. To me GOALS is a more long term way of looking at New Years Resolutions. You can make and stick to goals at any time of the year, not just beginning on January 1st.


Goal-Setting 101

I’m not sure where I first heard about it, but I think the simplest guideline to setting goals is to make sure they are SMART. I mean obviously you don’t want to set dumb goals *eyeroll*. But if you just say your goal is “to lose weight”, for instance… how would you even know when or if that goal has been met? So make your goals…

  1. Specific – write down your goal using specific language rather than ambiguous terms. What do you want to accomplish, where and why? “I want to lose 15 pounds” is much more specific than lose weight. Also, what specific steps can be taken to attain that goal? “I will go to the gym 4 days a week” or “I will not eat desserts 6 out of 7 days of the week.” Those are both very specific steps that can be taken to help you achieve your goal of losing 15 pounds.
  2. Measurable – make the goal something that you can actually objectively track the progress of. You can’t track an ambiguously phrased “lose weight”, but you can step on a scale each day to measure how much of the 15 pounds you’ve lost. Seeing the progress in real time will actually do wonders for your momentum and motivation.
  3. Attainable – YES, even goals are confined to the laws of physics. I know, I know, we all wish we could just have one million dollars by tomorrow, but this is not a realistic or attainable desire. It is attainable to make a goal to “save up $5000 in 6 months” or something like that. It is attainable to “lose 15 pounds by next Christmas”. Make sure the goal is actually something that you can achieve and not just a wild fantasy you have, otherwise nothing but frustration will ensue.
  4. Relevant – I guess this means a goal you set should be something that’s worthwhile to you while also in line with your other goals. Your goals should complement each other and help push you to be exactly who you want to be.
  5. Time-bound – I think this might be the most important of them all. Exactly by WHEN do you plan to meet your goal? “I want to lose 15 pounds.” By tomorrow? As if. Set a time limit. “I want to lose 15 pounds by June 30, 2019.” Thats about a 6 month time frame. Not only would this be perfectly feasible, but the sense of urgency that a time limit sets will allow you to stay focused and motivated.

I want to mention one more goal-setting guideline that is not included in this model but I think is absolutely CRUCIAL. WRITE YOUR GOALS DOWN ON PAPER. Put them in a place where you will see them and be reminded of them daily. Each day ask yourself, “What have I done today to bring myself closer to my goals?” Every day you should do at least one thing, no matter how small, that will propel you forward. Going back to the theoretical weight loss goal, maybe the one thing you did was make the choice to not eat the donuts your coworkers brought to work. AND THAT’S A HARD CHOICE, TRUST ME, I KNOW. But every day you have the chance to make little choices that add up to big changes. If you just have your goals floating around in your head, it will be harder to take real-life steps toward them. Writing them down makes them tangible.


My Goals for 2019

So what are MY goals for 2019?? I may have a couple…

Maybe that last goal isn’t quite measurable or specific, but that one may be the most important to me of them all. I am going to be a mom. It is still crazy to me but each day I will do whatever I can to make sure that little baby feels loved and safe.

Each of these is important to me for different reasons, but they are all intended to help me be the happiest, healthiest, and most successful I can be. Some of these goals are stepping stones to even longer term goals (education, career, etc.). I have been especially overwhelmed lately with the concept of getting a graduate degree, especially with the unexpected little bundle of joy that will be here before I know it. My goals have had to shift a lot from what they would have been were I not now growing my little family.

But that’s okay. That’s just life. Life is unexpected and will always throw curveballs your way. What’s important is the ability to remain flexible and adapt and grow with those changes. Maybe 2018 didn’t end for you exactly as you would have planned, but you’re about to have 365 brand new, shiny and fresh chances to make the most of each day, to grow and to learn and to appreciate all of the blessings that life gives you. You are breathing and you are alive and this coming year is going to be SPECTACULAR. ✭

100 Days of Tracking Macros

(Or Why I Deleted MyFitnessPal)

This morning I logged into MyFitnessPal, just as I have done religiously for 102 days straight (apparently), and kind of had an epiphany/breakdown.  This past May, I joined a certain online nutrition program that will remain nameless because I still really idolize, respect, and look up to the owner as a person.  They are doing great things for many people and putting a lot of amazingly positive content into the world that I still read daily.  I think I am coming to the conclusion that tracking my food just isn’t for me (and may not be for everyone), for reasons that I will elaborate on shortly.

I did not join because I needed to lose weight, or needed to get a certain physique for a competition, or anything like that.  I joined simply looking for a way to increase my nutrition knowledge and take myself to “the next level” (whatever that is).  I was already looking great and feeling great, having followed a relatively keto lifestyle for more than a year.   I guess you could say I had more or less figured out what worked for me.

I never tracked my food.  I ate when I was hungry and fasted when I was not.  I did not weigh myself for months at a time and would be remarkably surprised on those rare occasions that I did weigh myself and find that I had lost weight.  I ate mostly protein, vegetables, and fat.  Coming from a historically very disordered relationship with food and borderline sugar addiction, I felt I had these both under  control.  I rarely had cravings for sugar or dessert, and did not think about the quantity of food that I ate on a minute-to-minute basis.  For me quality became the most important factor.

Anyways, for whatever reason, I decided to blow almost $500 in order to have someone tell me exactly how much food I am supposed to eat each day.  All of a sudden quantity took center stage again.  I had to make sure I ate exactly the number of grams of protein, carbs, and fat that were prescribed to me EVERY. SINGLE. DAY.  Even if I did not feel hungry, I was expected to eat them.  Which more often than not resulted in me stuffing myself at the end of each day, just to hit my numbers.

From 0 to 200.  Real Quick.

The main issue I had right at the start was the fact that I was assigned to eat 200 grams of carbs a day.  200?!  The number alone made my head spin.  I had spent the last almost two years eating less than 70 grams a day.  I got my carbs from vegetables and the occasional sweet potato and that’s about it.  At the time I was not eating fruit (even though I LOVE fruit), and honestly feel that this played a huge factor in the drastic reduction of my sugar cravings.  Sugar acts like a drug on the brain, releasing dopamine and all the happy feels whenever it is consumed.  The more you introduce sugar to your body (even in the “innocuous” form of fructose), the more the body craves it.  Take out sugar altogether, and eventually the cravings simply disappear.

Now here I am, trying to fill in 200 grams of a macronutrient that I am simply not used to consuming.  My coach recommended sweet potatoes, mangoes, bananas, apples, oatmeal, quinoa.  Not only did I start eating a TON of fruit (HELLO, SUGAR!) but reintroducing long-absent grains back into my diet.  All of a sudden I’m drizzling honey on my fruit because, hey, there’s 17 more grams of pure carbohydrate to bump up my numbers.  Needless to say, my sugar cravings came back at full force with a vengeance, and I am still battling them today.

Where I expected to lean out and gain muscle, I instead started to feel overfed, bloated and fat all the time.  I don’t know whether I was actually in a state of ketosis before, but I definitely was used to fasting at more regular intervals.  If I didn’t feel hungry I simply wouldn’t eat breakfast in the morning.  Now I was force feeding myself just to make sure the numbers on MyFitnessPal were approved by another person each day.

Eating out at restaurants became a HUGE stressor as well because I felt compelled to exactly, accurately track every single morsel of food that went into my body.  If I felt like I didn’t have control over the ingredients going into my food, then I didn’t have control over my nutrition and that somehow that made me a failure.  I felt that even one day of not having control would completely set me back in my fitness goals.

Abs to Flabs

The irony of this nutrition program is that it is supposed to heal your relationship with food and help you realize that it’s okay to be flexible in what you eat.  If you look on instagram, there are boatloads of success stories.  Side by side images of people with flab and then well-defined abs 4-8 weeks later.  Honestly, I pretty much already had visible abs when I started the program.  But week after week, as I continued to trust the process, I watched in horror as my abs became softer and less noticeable.  How did I seem to be the ONE PERSON not achieving great results with this program?!  I know that I was not cheating.  I am so strict with myself about what I eat (almost to a harsh and negative degree), that I did the program exactly as I was supposed to.

I started compulsively weighing myself each day.  I did not feel that I was gaining muscle (certainly doesn’t look like it), yet I was seeing the number on the scale slowly creeping up.  I panicked.  How do I get the number to go back down?!  When did everything get so out of control??  I was weighing and measuring all my food to the gram, much to the annoyance of everyone in my family, and tracking everything in MyFitnessPal just like I was supposed to.  And yet every day I felt worse.  I felt physically worse and mentally worse.

Where I was supposed to “heal” my relationship with food, I actually created an anxious cloud of unhappiness and guilt.  If I couldn’t track it, it was somehow “immoral”.  If I went over my calories or one of my macronutrient numbers I was hammered with guilt and feelings of shame.  After two months I decided to cancel my subscription of this service, only to be told I had to be billed for one more month because I had agreed to a three-month minimum commitment.

That’s fine.  I paid for the last month but I did not log in or check in with my coach.  I tried to readjust my macros on MyFitnessPal to resemble a more ketogenic style of eating.  I continued to track, but still felt immense guilt and failure when I did not hit my self-imposed macro numbers.

I’m A Slave 4 Food

(Yes, in my mind I sang that to the tune of the Britney Spears song).

As the summer progressed, I realized that I had become a slave to my thoughts about food.  I thought about food literally ALL.  THE.  TIME.  I woke up with cravings for breakfast (usually something sweet), and as soon as I finished breakfast I was thinking about lunch. As soon as I finished lunch I was planning what to make for dinner.  After dinner I was battling the desire for dessert.  I have been going through periods of extreme restriction and then breaking down and eating unhealthy desserts because at times the willpower simply requires too much mental energy to maintain.

I feel bloated all the time and I feel inconsistent with my nutrition and I don’t like what I see in the morning when I look in the mirror.  I used to wake up full of energy with a flat stomach, and if it bloated during the day because of veggies (yes, I love broccoli and cauliflower but they do cause temporary bloat), the next morning I would always feel brand spanking new again.  Somewhere, despite the extreme illusion of control created by tracking, weighing, measuring, and reporting my food, I went off the rails.  WAY off.  And I can’t seem to find my way back to being okay like I was before.

Food has simultaneously become a source of pleasure and a source of guilt.  I eat for pleasure then immediately feel guilty if I overeat or consume something that doesn’t “fit my macros”.  Somewhere along the way I have stopped speaking to myself with kindness when it comes to food.  I know I am not fat, I know that most of this is in my head.  I am beyond a Type A personality.  If there was a letter before A, I would be that type.  Seriously.  I like to control everything.  And feeling so out of control with my eating has caused me a lot of cognitive dissonance.

Should You Track?

Ultimately it’s up to you.  If you are someone that really needs to lose a lot of weight and has a hard time controlling what you eat, then the discipline instilled with tracking might actually do you a great service.  If you aren’t as educated about food quality or have never learned about proper quantity as it relations to nutrition, then I highly recommend finding a nutrition coach to help you get started in your journey.

However, if you are someone like me, who is already very good about eating wholesome, healthy foods, and tends to have a somewhat disordered relationship with food, I do not recommend including tracking or weighing food into your routine.  I became unhealthily obsessive about tracking my food to the point that it consumes most of my thoughts.  It became a direct reflection of my self-worth as a person.  If I am under my calorie goals, then I am worthy, but if I go over any of my numbers somehow I am not worthy.  Trust me, I know it sounds crazy.  But that’s just the nature of eating disorders.

Tracking macros can easily give way to these unhealthy obsessive thoughts which in turn can result in restrictive eating patterns.  Or the opposite: making unhealthy food choices on a much more frequent basis simply because it “fits in your macros” for the day.  I was adding honey, cashew ice cream, excess fruit, frozen waffles into my daily eating routine simply because I needed to “fill in the carbs”.  And now that I am trying to remove those sugar cravings and go back to eating real foods that make me feel good, it is EXTREMELY HARD.  My brain is screaming at me to eat chocolate chip waffles for breakfast, when I know my body feels so much better when I have scrambled eggs with spinach and peppers.

MyFitnessPal is not my Pal.

I am not saying tracking is not for anyone, but it is not for everyone.  I made a nutrition move that I thought would benefit me in the long-term, and now feel like I am picking up shattered pieces of myself as I go.  I feel like I have to repair my relationship with food and a big reason for this blog post was to kind of work out my anxieties and put them onto paper. (You know what I mean).  I know there’s no end goal to nutrition.  You don’t just get to a certain place and that’s where you stay for the rest of your life.  It’s a constant balance of lifestyle and eating what’s good for your body at that particular moment.  I’m hopeful that I will get out of this rut.  It seems like the more I try to regain control, the more out of control things get.

So today I simply decided to let go.  I deleted MyFitnessPal from my phone (!!) and for the first time in 102 days, I could not tell you exactly how many calories I ate today. I cannot tell you how many grams of carbs, fat, or protein.  I am just going to eat when I am hungry and not eat when I am not hungry.  I am going to gradually reduce my sugar intake, in hopes that the rampant cravings will slowly subside.  I will love myself, even if I eat something “unhealthy” and I will love myself when I have a perfect day of nutrition.  I will no longer be a slave to my kitchen food scale or to my bathroom scale.

In the end, it is important that I nourish my body and my mind.  Obsessively tracking all my food was doing neither of these, and so today I have said goodbye.

Spring Cleaning

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My life is about to change.  A LOT.  I’ve been in Miami for 5 years and my boyfriend has been in Miami almost his whole life.  We have both been itching to get out and experience living in a different (read: cheaper!!) city.  When we are ready to buy a house there is NO WAY Miami would be an option.  I am from Dallas and recently found out my grandmother’s health is not in great condition, so we saw this as a perfect opportunity to not only move over there to spend time with family, but as a stepping stone to save money for our future house.  All of this has happened rather quickly, and the moving process is well underway.

But this is not the point of this post.  As I have been packing up my apartment, I have been reflecting on just how much STUFF I have.  Clothes, shoes, and jewelry that I never wear.  Hair products and makeup that I never use.  Kitchen tools that I don’t need.  Books I bought six years ago and never “got around” to reading.  This list of utterly useless junk that I haven’t touched in over a year (or in some cases years) is endless.  It is simply not necessary for me to move halfway across the country with all of these material things that are not of use to me.  What’s more, what if they would be USEFUL to someone else? Someone in need who hasn’t been as fortunate as me to be able to mindlessly buy a pair of high heels from Target??? High heels which were worn NOT EVEN ONCE.

All at once the realization hit me that all of these things aren’t just creating clutter in my physical space, but in my mental space as well.  Having more clothes just means more laundry which means more stress.  Unnecessary clutter barrages our mind with stimuli and makes relaxation more difficult.  I’ve been at work the last few days and just trying to mentally sort through all of the crap I have to literally sort through has been causing me anxiety.

I have spent years collecting things, following the misconception that more stuff equals more happiness.  But this is just NOT TRUE.  It is not the new dress or the new pair of earrings that will make you happy.  The memories you create whilst wearing those items will do more for your life satisfaction than the dress or earrings ever will.

The more I box up things to give to those in need, the lighter and more mentally clear I feel.  I don’t need all these things.  Getting rid of these things is allowing those that are truly important to rise to the surface.  I’m not saying you have to literally throw away all your clothes, but if you  haven’t worn something at least 2 or 3 times throughout the last year, I promise you can live without it.  I challenge you to undergo a round of spring cleaning, revisit your closet, your kitchen, your life.  Eliminate those things which are not essential and make room for things that matter more.  Make more room for new clothes, new friends, new experiences.

Get rid of the unnecessary and “It is astounding what will flow into that space that will enrich you, your life, and your family.”